Some suffering may be redemptive, but some is just plain senseless

S

“Why do you think God allowed you to get Parkinsons?”

This question or some derivative of it is commonly put to me, or if not put to me directly, at least thought about. Behind it lies the assumption that there must be some divine purpose to everything that happens, including the bad. People want to make meaning out of suffering, and thinking that it is part of a grand plan of God helps them find that meaning.

To me the question doesn’t make much sense. Certainly there is purpose to some suffering: the death of Christ; the pains of childbirth; the soldier going to war. But it strikes me that most suffering is not like this. Where is the higher purpose to the child starving to death; a body wracked by disease; or a person being the victim of a brutal and violent attack? Suffering in the first and last of these instances reflects the utter banality of evil, while the middle case surely reflects the chaotic nature of what from a Christian perspective is a broken world.

To ascribe a higher purpose to these forms of suffering is to turn God into a practitioner of a perverse kind of consequentialist ethic where the end justifies the most abominable means. And I can’t help but feel that it somehow diminishes the chaotic, disordered, and at times malevolent nature of evil. That’s the “genius” of evil. It has no purpose. It simply destroys.

As I read the story of Jesus, the great comfort is not that there is a higher purpose to everything that happens in my life, but that God, rich with love for all he has made, is acting purposefully to bring to an end all that diminishes the flourishing of creation. Consequently, while I see no grand purpose to my Parkinson’s, I do see a grand purpose to my life and to what God is doing in the world. I draw comfort not from the idea that there is a reason that I suffer, but from the hope that a new world is coming in which suffering will be no more.

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27 Comments on "Some suffering may be redemptive, but some is just plain senseless"

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David Chatelier
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Lindsay Cullen
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Very true, and to add a further thought, one of the benefits of a non-penal-substitutionary atonement model as discussed in your last post, is that it allows you to see Jesus’ death less as something ‘purposed’ by God, and more as something which is the result of human evil but is miraculously given new, added meaning by God.

Brian Nthengu
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I found these to be good illustrations to me keep on sending more to me .God bless you so much!.

Wendy Creamer
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thank you Scott…..I agree

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Lachelle Vandersteen
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Reading this in icu with a very sick child – I appreciate your wisdom and perspective on suffering Scott, thank you and bless you.

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Trudi Harper
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Thanks Scott your words are so true I have had 2yrs of test to find I have had this condition since early childhood x

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Sandra Smith
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Hello Scott! So pleased to discover your Internet address, from somewhere in our church (Springwood Baptist). I was present I believe during your most recent visit to SBC. I have enjoyed your message on the topic of suffering, & thank you for being so honest & open about your Parkinson’s. I too have begun to experience the approaching abandonment by all or some, of me, as a 74-yr-old woman I suffer from Type 2 Diabetes, & have recently received pain in my feet, & possible Irritable Bowel Syndrome. These things slow one down, & make it harder just to do… Read more »
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